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    Last request - 60 minutes 25 Requests today 4.6/5 of 89 Ratings

    A Guide to Window Screens

    Despite their nearly invisible presence, new window screens are a critical addition to your windows. Screens allow homeowners to keep their windows open during the warmer seasons so that they can enjoy the fresh, cool air without pesky insect intruders. They also boost your home's energy efficiency, providing natural ventilation and often eliminating the need for air conditioning.
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    While screens are cheap and subtle enough that some homeowners may overlook them, there are a few different options for new window screens. More expensive, stronger specialty screen materials can help to protect and extend the life of expensive other window investments. Homeowners searching for more information on the various types and costs of new window screens should continue reading for more information.

    Common Materials for New Window Screens

    Frequently used for new window screens today, both aluminum and the newer vinyl-coated fiberglass are rugged materials that no will longer rust or corrode like their predecessors (such as steel). Vinyl-coated fiberglass screens are about half the price of aluminum screens, but they are more likely to stretch and tear than aluminum is. While most people buy fiberglass for their new window screens, homeowners can often save money by choosing the sturdier aluminum.

    Homeowners can also purchase heavy-duty new window screens made from bronze, copper, brass, or even stainless steel. Though these materials can boost the strength of window screens, homeowners should still be wary of screens made from special metals. By installing brass, bronze, or copper new window screens in a frame made for aluminum, the screen will begin to corrode where the two metals will touch.

    Pet-Resistant Screens

    Homeowners with pets who inflict heavy wear and tear on their screens might want to consider pet-resistant material. Look for material made from heavy-duty, vinyl-coated polyester. Another option is Elgar Products, Inc.'s FlexScreen, a flexible, nylon-reinforced material that will stretch without sagging.

    Energy Efficient New Window Screens

    For homeowners looking for new ways to save on the monthly energy bill, a type of fiberglass screen called a solar, or “sun” screen offers multiple ways of boosting energy efficiency. Not only is this tightly-woven solar material able to block heat gain, reducing your home's need for expensive air conditioning, sun screens also cool the home by reducing around 30 percent of its natural light. While the solar screen is made only for fiberglass new window screens, the ShadeScreen from Phifer Wire Products provides an alternative for homeowners seeking efficient aluminum new window screens.

    Costs for New Window Screens

    As stated earlier, fiberglass is about half the price of aluminum. For fiberglass screens, prices usually are between 15 to 25 cents per square foot. Aluminum, on the other hand, is generally about 30 to 35 cents per square foot.

    Specialty screens tend to be slightly more expensive. Bronze is the least expensive, at about $1 per square foot, while copper and stainless are closer to $1.20. Energy efficient solar screens are generally about $1.50 per square foot. Brass screens are about $2.15 per square foot. When ordering specialty metals, plan to pay around $75 for your new window screens.

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    Written by: Ryan Mchugh, Editor www.HomeAdvancement.com