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    The Best Roofing Materials for the Midwest

    ​In the Midwest, the only weather constant is change. On New Year’s Day, lows can plunge far below zero with bone dry winds blowing through the region. By April or May, you may be in the midst of 4-6 moderate (and soggy) weeks. By June, you're usually draped in thick humidity that sticks around through August. It’s a beautiful, natural cycle, but it puts your roof through the ringer.
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    Midwest roofing materials should stand up to the region's diverse weather patterns. If you're unsure when it comes to choosing a roof for your Midwestern home, never fear: check out our guide to find the best Midwest roofing for your home today.

    Midwest Roofing: Asphalt Shingles

    Asphalt roofing materials are the most popular roofing materials in the Midwest and throughout the U.S. Depending on who you ask, as much as 85% of the U.S. roofing market is asphalt. If the name of the Midwest roofing game is versatility, asphalt shingles are versatile enough. They are moisture-resistant, they are coated to resist ultraviolet rays, and they can come in dark colors that pull in heat in the winter months.

    Asphalt is an affordable option and, while they don’t last as long as other materials, asphalt roofs can handle the harshest Midwest weather (other than tornadoes, of course) for 15-20 years or more.

    Midwest roofing should be able to adapt to the region's diverse seasons. | © CC BY-SA 2.0 flickr.com / Teemu008

    Midwest Roofing: Wood Shingles

    Though beautiful, wood is also subject to the laws of nature and is susceptible to warping and rotting. This fact deters some Midwest roofing consumers from considering wood. However, moisture-proofing and other technologies have advanced tremendously in recent years. Wood shingles or shakes can be made from different types of wood, but the most cost-effective Midwest roofing option available is cedar.

    Cedar shakes cost more than asphalt, but they last longer and are more beautiful. The beauty factor can make a positive difference in a property’s value. Skeptical Midwest roofing customers should keep in mind that, although wood shakes require more regular maintenance than asphalt, they fare better in severe storms and they are much more energy efficient.

    Midwest Roofing: Slate

    For centuries, many property owners have chosen slate roofs. Another natural choice, slate is a versatile, fine-grained rock and is extremely moisture and temperature resistant. If you're thinking this sounds perfect for Midwest roofing, you're right. The only reason all Midwest roofing consumers don’t use it is the cost.

    Slate is relatively rare and must be extracted from a quarry. Another factor that drives up cost is slate’s heavy weight. This makes transportation more expensive and installation more slow. Added structural supports are sometimes needed to hold the weight of the material. Once it is in place, however, it can handle large quantities of snow and can last for over a century.

    This guide does not cover every roofing option available to Midwest consumers, but it details some of the very best options for an ever-changing climate. When deciding on Midwest roofing materials, it's important to think through all the factors associated with the four seasons, even the ones you dread to think about. To find the best Midwest roofing material, be sure to check out our database of contractors today.

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